Greeting Card Ornament

I saw a tutorial at The Space Between Blog where Karah made Christmas tree ornaments from her wedding cards. I have been saving the birthday cards Eli received for his first birthday this past year and thought this would be a great way to use them. I think I will do this every year. It will be fun to pull them out and remember as the years go by.

First I took out the cards and traced a circle around the part I wanted to cut out.

I was bummed not to ba able to use this handmade card from his cousins, but 3D wouldn’t work here.

Then I cut out the circles which I then folded in half.

The resulting half circles were then glued together to form the two halves of the ornament.

Before gluing the 2 halves together I glued in the ends of the ribbon hanger.

Here it is hanging on our tree.

I like how Karah’s ornaments look with the glitter on the edges of the circles. I will probably end up doing that too, but I have to buy the glitter first!

This project is a quicky. I think it took me about 20 minutes start to finish.

Advertisements

Baby Sleep Sack from Quilt

This was one of the first quilts I attempted to make. It contains a mixture of new cloth (some bought in thrift stores) and cloth from worn out clothing. I had been making it for a young cousin, but it contained so many flaws that in the end I could not bring myself to give it. I stopped working on it just shy of finished  and packed it away in a box where it has sat forgotten for the last  seven or eight years. I pulled it out over Thanksgiving and decided I should either bind it or get rid of it. The flaws that bothered me before bother me even more now, but I hate to waste something potentially useful so I decided to make a baby sleep sack.

Here are directions if you would like to make a sleep sack of your own. If you find any of the instructions unclear, feel free to contact me for clarification.

Get a sleep sack  and fold it in half. Trace onto freezer paper. You could use a shirt and freehand draw the sack part but I wasn’t sure how large to make the sack part. Add seam allowance to the shoulder the side edge and the bottom. I added 1/4″ out of habit. I would suggest at least 1/2″ due to the thickness of the quilt. This is the back piece. The edge going down the center will be placed on the fold when cutting the quilt fabric.

Now for the front pieces. Use a new piece of freezer paper. Trace the shoulder and arm hole. Make a mark where the front neckline falls. Remove the sleep sack from the paper and draw a slightly curved line from that mark up to the shoulder.  Put this paper on top of the back pattern piece and trace the sack line. Add a seam allowance to the center line this time.

Place your back pattern piece on the fold of  the quilt you are repurposing. Iron it down so it won’t slide while you cut. Pin it to keep the folded layers together. Cut it out. Repeat for the front piece, but this time place it a little bit off the edge of the fold and cut all the way around. You will now have 3 pieces.

This jacket was fairly new, but the sleeve had an unfortunate encounter with adhesive that couldn’t be remedied. Originally I was going to use the zipper, but I’ve never done a zipper before and feel a bit intimidated. I found this strip of snaps around the collar to use instead.

I cut it out,  put it alongside the middle edge of one of the front pieces and marked the point to which to sew the seam from the bottom up the front.

Sew the center seam to that point. Here is where I wished I had larger seam allowances. I wanted to sew the seam open on each side and continue sewing the fabric folded over all the way to the top. This wasn’t possible so I trapped the raw edge under a strand of ribbon on each side of the front of the sleep sack and stitched down both sides of the ribbon.

 

On the front side attach one side of the snap strip. One edge was already finished so I turned it over and sewed the cut edge down. I also folded down and sewed the raw edges of the top and bottom of the strip.

 

The black snap strip looks rather ugly on this pink and purple sleeper so I wanted to cover the top snap strip with matching fabric. I took some cloth from one of the side borders of the quilt.  Trim the top and the bottom of the snap strip so that they line up perfectly with the other side. Put the snap strip and fabric right sides together and stitch up one edge. Fold the fabric around the back side of the snap strip. Fold over the fabric on the top and bottom of the snap strip and pin. Sew all the way around all 4 edges of the snap strip using a zipper foot to ease by the snaps.

 

Fold over the remaining raw edge twice and press. Snap the snap strips together. Sew down the long edge of the snap strip flap to attach it to the front to the sleep sack.

Pin the front and back pieces of the sleep sack right sides together at the shoulders. The photo shows pins all the way around, but I ended up having to remove pins from the sides to be able to work on the shoulders.

After sewing the shoulders cover the seam on the inside with a strip of knit material. I sewed on a piece cut from an old sweatshirt then trimmed off the excess.

 

Now pin the sides and bottom and sew all the way around from the bottom of one arm hole to the bottom of the other. Use a walking foot as there are many layers of fabric and batting here. I found I needed to go slow, remove pins before the walking foot reached them, and tug the material gently to release any little tucks beginning to form.

Turn it right side out. Almost done!

Now cut a strip of knit material to bind the edges around the sleep sack’s arm and neck openings. A 1″ width strip cut from the bottom of a large t-shirt worked well for me. It was just long enough to bind all three openings with the one strip. I sewed it around the arm opening and then cut the excess instead of measuring lengths. Lay it alongside the edge of the sleep sack arm opening and stitch it down with 1/4″ seam allowance. Once you cut off the excess length fold in the end. Turn the sleep sack inside out. Fold the fabric in through the arm opening, fold the edge under and pin all the way around. Sew it down on the inside. Follow the same process for the neck opening.

   

Here is the finished binding.

While sewing up this sleep sack I found a couple small tears in the quilt. I cut out two heart shapes from the white t-shirt and sewed a patch with embroidery floss to cover each hole.

   

Finally, the finished sleep sack from a repurposed quilt!

Yay! I’ve been featured!

Confessions of a Stay At Home Mommywww.thegrantlife.com

Here’s where I’m linking up. (Please see my Linky List page for active links):

{nifty button}Sunday's Best Linky Party!http://www.thegrantlife.com/search/label/financial%20fridaySix Sister's StuffEverything Under the MoonLink PartyClothes Upcycling Projectsshabby creek cottageyou are talking too much

SortaCrunchyNet

IhookedupwithHoHlamespice

Confessions of a Stay At Home MommyHope StudiosPhotobucketall crafts Homemade Projects ~ Add Yours {11/22}I'm topsy turvy tuesdays

linkingpartybadge copymad skills buttonSomewhat SimplebuttonCatch a Glimpse Button

Lovebirds Wreath

I had so much fun making this wreath for my Etsy shop. I can’t wait to share the process with you. All of my materials were things I had on hand other than the wreath form.

I was going to use an old bed sheet for the fabric, but I found a piece of muslin left over from a long ago project and I liked the off white semi-speckled color better. Tear your fabric into strips a couple of inches wide.

Attach the end of a strip of fabric to the wreath form with a glue gun. Wrap it around the form and tack down the end with another drop of glue. Attach the next strip and continue until the entire wreath is wrapped.

 

To make the nest take a few pages out of an old book and cut into thin strips. Scrunch up the strips to form a loose ball.

Cut a small circle of fabric to use as a base. Spread hot glue over it and press the paper ball onto the glue.

  

Find a couple of sticks that appeal to you. I glued one to form the branch for the nest to rest on and placed the other in the position that seemed best to me.

Glue the nest onto the wreath.

Now it is time to make the birds. I like to draw the pattern for each bird freehand so that they are a little bit different from each other. Here is what a simple bird pattern looks like. (Note, this notepaper is 4″ x 6″.)

I did see a bird pattern here from Spool Sewing that can be printed out. I didn’t print it out myself so I’m not certain about the size. You could reduce it on a photocopier if need be.

Sew your birds and stuff them. This fabric came from one of my favorite shirts that is no longer wearable. I used buttons for the eyes of one bird and beads from a broken hair clip for the other.

 

Glue the bird into the nest.

Glue the other bird wherever it looks best to you.

Now it’s time to add a bit more texture and decoration. I wound some twine around part of the wreath, and added a few beads attached with glue.

 

Attach some method of hanging to the back. I used a bit of leather cord knotted at the ends and glued.

Update: I found that gluing the branches and hanger wasn’t enough. I went back in and sewed them onto the muslin with invisible thread for added strength.

Thanks for reading!

Here’s where I’m linking up:

Grab Our BadgeMaking Monday Marvelous Linky PartyConfessions of a Stay At Home Mommy

Hope StudiosBLOG TITLEshabby creek cottage

2805www.thegrantlife.comChic on a Shoestring Decorating<br><br><br><b>Join us every Friday...</b>Feathered Nest FridaySix Sister's StuffThe Shabby Nest

{nifty button}linkingpartybadge copy

Elfin Hat from Sweater

Here is the original sweater. I used the sleeves for fluffy-bottom sweater pants and the third photo is what remained.

I cut out the back panel. I cut strips out of t-shirt material to add as stripes. I wanted a kind of whimsical appearance to the hat so I cut the stripes a little bit wonky.

Then I pinned the stripes to the sweater back.

Next I sewed these down using a zigzag stitch.

I folded the now stripey sweater back in half and cut out my hat shape with a rotary cutter. I made the base of the hat 9″ across and didn’t begin angling the sides to the point until the first stripe, 5″ up from the bottom. I marked the lines I wanted to cut with a sliver of soap, visible on dark fabrics yet completely washable.

Now I put the hat pieces right sides together and pinned along the side edges.

Using the zigzag stitch on the sewing machine I sewed the pinned sides. I used a tight zigzag and went over it more than once to make sure there was no uncaught yarn ends.

Time to turn it right side out and think about embellishments.

I decided to put a patch with an airplane button below the first stripe…

and a tassel made from strips of the same t-shirts as the stripes.

Here is the finished hat!

I also had a lot of sweater material left from this pair of sweater pants, so I made this hat. It was a birthday present for a lovely five year old friend of ours this past weekend.

I’m honored to have been featured here:

Photobucket

Here’s where I’ve linked up:

madskillsbutton2_thumb1_thumb1_thumb[1]Confessions of a Stay At Home Mommy

linkingpartybadge copy

Dittle DattlePhotobucketmmm buttonPhotobuckethomeworkHope StudiosI'm topsy turvy tuesdaysClothes Upcycling Projects

The Shabby NestSortaCrunchyNetshabby creek cottage

My apologies if I linked up to you but don’t have your button here. My computer crashed after I had linked up with quite a few parties but before I had updated the post, so the buttons I had grabbed were lost.