Hashi Stool Face Lift

Remember this… one of the most versatile toys ever that can be created in your very own living room from discarded cardboard?

No? Go here to learn to make one of your very own (and also a bit more about why you might want to)!

Yes? Great. Then you also remember that I was not a fan of the brown bunny decorative paper it was covered with.

Eli and I went to the library this week and on the cart outside was this book for sale for a quarter. Pretty damaged but full of delightful vintage illustrations.

Eli did not help me with the events to follow as I don’t want him getting the idea that it is a good idea to take scissors to books! This was a naptime project if there ever was one.

Who Killed Cock Robin? Really?

I like the illustrations on these pages, but definitely not something I’d deem appropriate for any small child. Basically it outlines the murder of a robin by a sparrow and the disposal of his mortal remains. For those as uninitiated as I was, here is a little sampling:

“Who caught his blood?

I, said the Fish,

With my little dish,

I caught his blood.”

So… Moving on.

The Owl and the Pussy Cat

Since this toy can be used in two different orientations I decorated one side right-side up and the other upside-down. Which is which depends upon if it is being used as a bridge or a rocker.

The other side received three different short nursery rhymes: Baa Baa Black Sheep, Jack Be Nimble, and Mary Had A Little Lamb.

I like it a lot more now. That’s all I got for ya today. Thanks for stopping by!

Karen

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12 Comments

  1. May 25, 2012 at 5:16 pm

    love it – very creative and literary

  2. ReStitch Me said,

    May 26, 2012 at 3:12 pm

    Excellent face lift! Isn’t it funny (weird) some of the old nursery stories/rhymes? I just checked out a book about children’s story illustration history from the late 1800’s to early 1900’s. There was ALOT of women who were topless (mermaids, faeries, etc.) That’s really not what I want my little boys to be looking at. lol

    • May 26, 2012 at 8:31 pm

      Interesting! I would have thought that back then they would have been much more conservative than they are now. That sounds like a fascinating book.

  3. Maysem said,

    May 27, 2012 at 8:03 am

    That looks wonderful! Love the new look!

    • May 27, 2012 at 7:45 pm

      Thank you, Maysem! And if I ever get tired of it I can just slap on a new layer. I’m loving the mod podge technique.

  4. adohrenwend said,

    May 27, 2012 at 10:49 pm

    Fantastic idea! Looks great!

  5. May 28, 2012 at 6:32 am

    So cute and clever! 🙂

  6. Inder said,

    May 28, 2012 at 3:03 pm

    Old nursery rhymes were full of violence and gore as well as sometimes not-so-hidden subversive political messages, etc. Who Killed Cock Robin is allegedly an allegory about the death of Robin Hood, and not about a bird at all. Nor was it really just a rhyme for children – rather, these rhymes developed as a way for the disenfranchised to express themselves at a time when there was no such thing as “free speech.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cock_Robin

    While we think of the past as more conservative in terms of sexual norms, etc., I think it’s safe to say that children raised on the original Grimm’s fairytales were less sheltered from cruelty and violence than children raised on the Disney versions today. I’m not saying that this is wrong or right – but these old rhymes and fairytales definitely didn’t present a rosy-colored vision of the world!

    • May 28, 2012 at 5:15 pm

      Thanks for the background to Cock Robin. I could see getting into studying this with Eli when he’s quite a bit older, but we will probably not be pursuing these sorts of nursery rhymes at this point. We will also skip nursery rhymes such as Peter, Peter, Pumpkin Eater and the Old Woman Who Lived in a Shoe until we can discuss them a bit more in depth than we’ll be able to in the near future.

      I remember being so shocked in middle school when we learned that the origin of “Ring Around the Rosy” was during the Black Plague.

      • Inder said,

        May 28, 2012 at 5:47 pm

        Haha. Yeah, well, Joe is just learning about the literal meanings of words! We haven’t started delving into subversive political subtexts quite yet! In time, in time …

      • May 28, 2012 at 5:50 pm

        Exactly…!


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